Our little ‘sprouts’

Back home in Colombia, I didn’t really understand the meaning of ‘organic food’. I thought that all tomatoes were organic just because they had grown on the ground, and thought that non-organic food was grown on a laboratory full of lamps, silly me!.

But now that I live with an Italian I learned the difference, between organic and non organic and need to buy only products with the best quality possible. But apparently this wasn’t enough.

It all started when we went to the food market one day and were looking for parsley, but instead of getting a tiny bunch he brought a plant. A plant?! When his mother came to visit, she saw us kill two plants in two weeks! So she gave us one, that is only alive because we go on holidays often, and she – the plant I mean, not the mother…ok, maybe the mother too – loves when we’re gone.

“We can’t have a plant! We are plants killers!” Is not what you think, I love plants, but I talk to them and water them, but they just don’t seem to like me at all, and die… But sure, when I opposed to this, didn’t have an idea of how ‘important it was’ for my Italian boyfriend to have fresh herbs to season food, but he completely convinced me… oh well, what could go wrong? Death! We had to bury a mint plant… But are the happy parents of an oregano, a hearty basil, a tall and flowery chilli, a happy rosemary and a not so happy parsley . Also my Cyclamen and our newest plant, an aloe vera. They just don’t seem to stop coming, this is what happens when an Italian convinces you of the incalculable benefits of fresh pesto.

Life with an Italian

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